Grant will help St. Vincent de Paul house more families

December 28, 2016


By Catholic Review Staff

A $1 million federal grant will allow St. Vincent de Paul of Baltimore to expand its Front Door Rapid Rehousing program, increasing families served from 65 to 110 annually. In addition, a portion of those families will include those fleeing intimate partner violence, thanks to a partnership with House of Ruth Maryland.

“We are thrilled to be able to expand these vitally needed, rapid rehousing services in Baltimore, and are especially pleased to be partnering with House of Ruth Maryland to provide these services to families who have been made homeless due to intimate partner violence,” said Mary Rode, senior vice president, program services, at St. Vincent de Paul, said in a news release.

“In recent years,” Rode continued, “St. Vincent de Paul of Baltimore has been at the forefront of introducing rapid rehousing strategies to homeless families in Baltimore City, working with our funding partners that include The Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation, the Abell Foundation, United Way and the City of Baltimore. We look forward to expanding the impact of these services and significantly reducing family homelessness.”

The grant, $1,042,320 to be precise, was awarded by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and fulfilled part of Baltimore’s Continuum of Care application.

St. Vincent de Paul’s Front Door Rapid Rehousing program assists families in locating market-rate rental units in communities close to where their children are in school and where they may have existing support systems. Families receive assistance in removing barriers to housing, and, based on their needs and resources, short- or medium-term rental assistance.

Case management is a critical component of the program, helping families access mainstream benefits, mental and physical health services, as well as supporting families as members work to maintain their educational, employment and financial well-being in order to achieve long-term economic self-sufficiency.